Bassi Falls Trail

IMG_6899Once you know how to get there, this is a great trail! (See “How to get there” below.) This is a very popular trail, and it’s easy to see why. Everyone loves to head to the water in the summer, especially a waterfall, and even more so to a waterfall that has natural pools you can swim in!

How to get there: Take US-50, exit Ice House Road and go north for about 16 miles. Make sure to take the turn to the right to stay on Ice House at just over 1/2 a mile from the freeway. The next part is key – after going over a bridge at about 16 miles (there’s no sign letting you know the name of the bridge),  look for Big Silver Group Campground on your left (see photo below – you’ll have passed another campground earlier, so make sure you get the name right!), and make an immediate turn to your right onto an unmarked road. There will be a fork in the road – go left to take a shorter trail (we didn’t go down that road), or straight/right to get to the trailhead  for a 4 mile hike to the falls. You’ll get to what looks almost like a dead end and can park here and walk down to the trailhead. (If it’s still there, you’ll see the sign in the photo below.) However, if you have 4WD, follow the sign down a short road down to get closer to the trailhead. Do not attempt this if you have a low suspension vehicle – there was no way I was going to try in our minivan. I promise this is all easier than it sounds, but I would not rely on GPS to get you there.

Why we love it: It’s a WATERFALL! That’s usually plenty enough motivation for my family. I appreciated the clear trail markers along the way, the many points you can get to the water, and that it was enough of a hike to feel like you accomplished something, but not so hard kids can’t do it.

For the Young Ones (0-10): I took my seven year-old son and wore my 8 week-old daughter, and had a friend with her eight year-old son and four year-old daughter. Honestly, I’m extremely impressed the four year-old hiked the entire thing (including IMG_6930walking and playing all over/around the falls). When you get to the water, just keep going down the trail to find an accessible point. For some, just getting to the lower falls will be plenty of enough for one trip. There are some shallow spots they can splash in, so it doesn’t hurt to bring swimsuits and water shoes

For the Big Kids (10+): Adventurous big kids will enjoy scrambling over rocks and swimming in deeper pools. I’ve read you can also scramble up the rocks to the top of the upper falls, but since I didn’t do this I’m not sure how dangerous it is.

Keep in Mind:

  • There are no lifeguards at the water. Proceed at your own risk and watch children closely.
  • There are no bathrooms so be prepared!
  • At the bottom of the lower falls we encountered lots of big black ants. We didn’t see them at the top of the lower falls or the upper falls.
  • When you get to the upper falls and cross the rocks to get to the water, it is easy to lose sight of where the trail came out onto the rocks. We actually started back on a trail that wasn’t the official trail, so make sure to do something to help you remember.

Around the Area: We saw campgrounds, a camping resort, and maybe a little store (?) along the road to the trailhead.

Difficulty Level: Moderate.

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Cronan Ranch Trails

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We did this trail back on March 31st, but I’m just now getting around to posting! Cronan Ranch is located in Pilot Hill, California, four miles north of Coloma on Hwy 49. We chose to do the Long Valley Trail to the river and back. Due to the high exposure of this hike, I would not recommend this on a high temp or sunny date. Our family originally attempted a hike here a few years ago and turned back after a half mile due to the direct exposure and heat.

Why we love it: It’s relatively flat and easy for kids and a great way to test out whether they can take on more miles. Once your kids easily conquer three-four mile trails, you can try this location for five-six miles. We always love a hike with a goal, and on this hike we make it a goal to reach the river. If you take the Long Valley Trail, once you pass the movie set and get to a fork in the trail, stay right to get to the water right away.

For the Young Ones (0-10): Once you get to the river, there’s a bit of shade and kids can spend hours throwing rocks into the river or splashing their feet! There’s even a bathroom not too far from where Long Valley Trail meets the water!

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For the Big Kids (10+): There are many trails you can take at Cronan Ranch, and big kids might like to mix it up to see more. A family picnic at the water would be fantastic for the entire family.

Keep in Mind:

  • The key thing to keep in mind here is sun exposure. As previously stated, it’s not a good idea to do this hike on a high temp sunny day.
  • Bring plenty of water! We used the picnic tables by the movie set as a snack break before making it all the way to the river.
  • Horses are often on these trails, so please remember that they have the right of way and watch where you walk!
  • It’s helpful to print/screen shot this map ahead of time to use for reference.
  • You could probably do the trail we did with a BOB-type stroller, but I wouldn’t recommend a typical lightweight stroller.
  • Depending on tires, etc. of a wheelchair and the grade of some of the slopes, I would not call this trail handicap accessible. (Though I am no expert.)

Around the Area: Folsom Lake for more water fun!

Difficulty Level: Advanced Beginner-Moderate, depending on trails taken and experience.

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Independence Trail – East

IMG_3790Taking the Independence Trail – East trail to where it “ends’ (at what looks like an old service road), the hike is about four to four and 1/2 miles total (out and back). You can continue past the obvious road on some unmaintained trails, but do so at your own risk – there’s lots of poison oak, but I’ve heard there are some paths that lead you to a watering hole or the river.

Why we love it: This trail is simple and beautiful + has the fun feature of lots of wooden footbridges – some quite long! Along the way you’ll be treated to glimpses of the Yuba River far below. About 1.75 miles along, there’s a really nice picnic table area just off to the right of the trail.

For the Young Ones (0-10): This trail is great for families who like to explore and have little hikers who will stay on the trail. Like the West side (see my previous post on that end of the trail here), there are “high” and “low” paths that travel together along the way. I’d recommend you keep the little ones on the low. Pay attention to the recent weather though – sometimes the “low” can get flooded or really muddy.

For the Big Kids (10+): While not a challenging hike, I do think this one is interesting enough to hold the attention of bigger kids. For those that can handle more miles, tack on the 5 miles of the Independence Trail – West trail, for a total of nearly 10 miles of hiking. IMG_E3778

Keep in Mind:

  • Last weekend there were no pesky mosquitos, but when our family did the west side in the summer there were lots. Bring repellant just in case!
  • The parking lot is easy to find by entering “Independence Trail ” into Google Maps (it’s on CA-49), and the official trailhead is for both the East and the West trails – with bathrooms!
  • There’s also an overflow parking lot just past the main lot, which has stairs that go up to the East trail.

Around the Area: Less than a mile northeast of the trailhead, you can take an exit to your right and pull into a big parking lot (on Google Maps, Yuba River swimming hole 49 bridge). Here, you have the opportunity to get out of the car, cross a pedestrian bridge, or go down stairs to the river! I bet in the summer it’s a great way to cool off!

Difficulty Level: Beginner.

Note: These photos are from a women-only hike I organized for February! Find more hikes you can join me on (both women-only and family-friendly) on my Facebook page, Family Trail Time.

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Effie Yeaw Nature Center

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Effie Yeaw Nature Center is a little oasis right in the city! It’s easy to get to, the trails are short and sweet, and there’s so much to observe and learn. I took an few hours to lead a Hike It Baby hike there this week and it was so much fun!

Why we love it: The nature center itself has live animals (who doesn’t love seeing owls, snakes, and more?) and an Exhibit Hall that allows visitors to explore the natural and cultural history of the Lower American River. Make sure to grab a free map (and pay your $5 parking fee) before heading outside. We loved all of the animals the kids were able to see, and how much fun they had throwing rocks into the American River!

For the Young Ones (0-10): If you’ve taken your little ones on paved walks around town, this is a perfect next step to graduate up to dirt and more narrow trails (not designed for strollers or wheelchairs). Our group had kids age 2 – age 7, and each and every one were in awe of the deer, birds, and tadpoles we spotted.

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For the Big Kids (10+): If big kids are interested in bird watching, this is a great spot! We saw many different kinds of birds, and even us adults were introduced to the red-breasted sapsucker.

Keep in Mind:

  • The nature center is inside Ancil Hoffman County Park. Driving along Tarshes Drive, just keep going and look for signs for the nature center and San Lorenzo Way.
  • Daily parking pass is $5, payable inside the nature center.
  • The American River is flowing fast right now. Take every caution near the water’s edge.
  • You may want to call ahead to make sure the nature center is accepting guests when you plan to go. They get extremely busy with field trips and summer camps, and may turn away groups during peak hours.

Around the Area: Home! It was so nice to be out in nature on a weekday, and still get home in time for dinner.

Difficulty Level: Beginner.

 

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Inside the nature center.